Making a Solar Cycle–A New Perspective

Solar-cycle-large

The chart below shows published sunspot data from 1960 to 2020 overlayed with two standing waves. The waves themselves reflect Jupiter’s orbital relationship with the Sun’s rotation. The color-coded circles on the chart identify the points of destructive interference associated with each of the two waves. The preliminary findings are not definitive and more study is needed. But, there may well be more than a casual relationship.

Solar-Cycle-Foot-Prints

Technically, Standing waves are stationary electric-only voltage potential oscillations, that produce electrical longitudinal vibrations. They are acted upon by traveling waves.

The illustration below shows what is commonly referred to as the Incident wave (blue) and the Reflected wave (green) from which the vibrational frequencies (contained within) manifest the Resultant standing wave (red).

Waventerference

The analytical values of a sine wave are its period, frequency and amplitude.

Amplitude

Amplitude refers to the amount of voltage between two points in a circuit. Amplitude commonly refers to the maximum voltage of a signal measured from the ground or zero volts. The waveform example has an amplitude of 1 V and a peak-to-peak voltage of 2 V.

Phase

The phase is best explained by looking at a sine wave. The voltage level of sine waves is based on circular motion. Given that a circle has 360°, one cycle of a sine wave has 360°. Using degrees, you can refer to the phase angle of a sine wave when you want to describe how much of the period has elapsed. Phase shift describes the difference in timing between two otherwise similar signals.

Interestingly, the precession of these two standing waves are ultimately responsible for major climate turning-points. Check it out!

TOMORROWS BREAKTHROUGHS WILL COME FROM THE VERY FRINGE OF SCIENTIFIC THINKING. HERE ARE JUST A FEW EXAMPLES OF REVOLUTIONARY IDEAS THAT ARE ALREADY IN PLAY.

Published by

Ronald Messick

Ron is an independent researcher with a focus on the inner workings of the solar system in general and on solar variability in particular. His most recent project, the solar system's schematic, has been a fulltime labor of love for the past 16-years. He is retired and resides in the beautiful Pacific Northwest.

Leave a Reply